Microsoft has publicly launched Photosynth. It allows you to stitch your photos together to create a detailed 3D environment. The photos can be just a handful or a few hundred and finally creates an image that a user can spin around to look at from all angles or zoom in to check out a close-up detail. While most of the computation is done on your desktop, the images are uploaded to Microsoft’s servers and Microsoft is giving all Photosynth users a total of 20GB of storage for their collections.


At Photosynth.com, anyone can view images created by other people and create their own. The creation process is simple, but still takes some time. Users select and upload a group of photos from their computers. The technology takes several minutes, depending on the number of photos, to examine the photos for common components in order to stitch them together into one image. Users still must download a piece of software that is about 8M bytes in size in order to use Photosynth.

Microsoft hopes to add more community sharing features to Photosynth.com in the future. For now, all images are public and people can comment on images. In the future, Microsoft may allow users to create communities and restrict viewing to people in those communities. Also, the front page of the Web site might feature the most popular images in the future. For now, Microsoft has chosen which images to display on the main page.

Users can embed their Photosynth images on other Web sites and send links to them to other people via e-mail. After creating a new Photosynth, people can mark them as copyrighted, protected under the Creative Commons license or public domain. Users can also flag images they think are inappropriate and Microsoft will consider removing them.

The Web site already has many images available for viewing, including some from National Geographic, which has worked with Microsoft over the past couple of months to upload images. Photosynth.com visitors can browse around pictures of iconic international sites such as the Taj Mahal, Hagia Sophia, Machu Picchu and the Sphinx.

If you have created your own PhotoSynth, leave a comment here with the details, would love to see them!

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Karthik is a mechanical engineer by profession and is also a web freak who loves to blog about interesting things happening on the web