For those who wanted to purchase apps, music albums, ebooks and movies among other things from Google Play Store India, but couldn’t do it because it required you to link a credit card to your account, or just because Google didn’t support your bank just yet, you will finally be able to purchase things off without ever needing a credit card.

gift cards

That’s because Google has just launched its Play prepaid vouchers in India. The cards come in Rs 500, Rs 1,000, and Rs 1,500 denominations. Using these vouchers, you will be able to purchase stuff from the company’s Play Store by simply feeding the code mentioned in the voucher card. You will find the redeem option in Google Play Store app.

Google Play prepaid vouchers was first launched in the US back in 2012. Google Play gift cards have expanded to 29 nations so far, including today’s launch into the Indian market. Not only does the voucher cards provide convenience to users while purchasing digital content from Android’s marquee store, it is also comforting to know that Play prepaid vouchers never expire.

In a blog post, the company notes that users will be able to purchase Google Play prepaid vouchers from select stores of Vijay Sales and Spice Hotspot in Delhi-NCR, Mumbai, Pune, Hyderabad, Bengaluru, Kolkata, and Jaipur. It’s transferable as well, so you can send your prepaid vouchers to your friends.

The world’s second most populous nation, India, is yet to see a boom in the credit and debit card penetration. Google’s decision to launch gift cards is likely to bolster sales in Play Store, though the company should be aiming at bringing bigger solutions, like partnering with telcos to enable operator billing in the country.


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Manish is pursuing a degree in Computer Science and Engineering but spends more time in writing about technology. He has written for a number of Indian and international publications including BetaNews, BGR India, WinBeta, MakeTechEasier, MediaNama, and Digit magazine among others. When not writing, you would find him ranting about the state of digital journalism on Twitter.