Addressing the ever-so-competitive Indian market, Chinese smartphone manufacturer Xiaomi today announces that it is making its Redmi Note 4G cheaper in the country. The smartphone manufacturer is cutting Rs 2,000 off of the original retail price of the Note 4G, setting the revised price tag to Rs 7,999.

xiaomi

For a refresh, the Note 4G sports a 5.5-inch 720p IPS display. It is powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 400 quad-core processor clocked
at 1.6GHz, coupled with 2GB of RAM and 8 gigs of internal storage. The dual-SIM capable phone supports 4G LTE, 3G, Wi-FI and other connectivity options.

Launched in November last year, the Redmi Note 4G has been a sleeper hit for the company. The phablet, much like company’s other smartphones was sold through Flipkart on flash sales and managed to move thousands of inventories in quick successions.

The price drop is a welcoming move from the company as the smartphone space has become competitive over the last few months. The most recent inclusion is the K3 Note from Lenovo which sports a 5.5-inch FHD display and offers 4G connectivity — in short, more advanced features than the Note 4G — and costs just Rs 9,999. Xiaomi is one of those rare companies that knows when to make its ever so cheap-priced smartphones and other products even cheaper.

With its new price tag, the Redmi Note 4G has once again become the best phablet in its respective category at its price point. The Huawei Honor 4X and the Lenovo A7000 — the Redmi Note 4G’s true competitors —  are priced at Rs 9,999 and Rs 8,999 respectively. Both the devices are yet to see a price drop. As for the Redmi Note 4G, you can purchase it on Mi.com, Flipkart, Amazon, Snapdeal, The Mobile Stores, and Airtel stores at the revised price point starting today.


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Author

Manish is pursuing a degree in Computer Science and Engineering but spends more time in writing about technology. He has written for a number of Indian and international publications including BetaNews, BGR India, WinBeta, MakeTechEasier, MediaNama, and Digit magazine among others. When not writing, you would find him ranting about the state of digital journalism on Twitter.