After India (the initial launch place), Indonesia, Myanmar, Bangladesh, Turkey, and Philippines, Google is adding one more nation to its slowly growing Android One territory. The Android-maker today launched the new QMobile A1 in Pakistan.

Qmobile A1

Android One, for those who don’t recall, is Google’s ambitious plan to improve the user experience in the low echelon segment. Announced at the I/O developer conference last year, for Android One project, the company has partnered with a number of smartphone manufacturers.

Google provides these companies with design guidelines — including hardware specs — that manufacturers have to follow. Among other interesting USPs, Android One handsets run on stock Android and receive updates directly from Google.

As for the just launched smartphone, the QMobile A1 is an entry level smartphone. It sports a 4.5-inch display with FWVGA (854×480 pixels) screen resolution. Inside the device sits a 1.3GHz processor from an unspecified manufacturer (likely Mediatek), coupled with 1GB of RAM, and 8GB internal storage that can be expanded up to 32GB using a microSD card should you need more storage.

Other features of the handset include a 5-megapixel snapper with LED flash at the back, and a 2-megapixel shooter placed upfront. There is a 1,700mAh battery powering the phone. On the software front, the 3G capable smartphone runs the latest Android 5.1 Lollipop out of the box.

The phone is priced at Rs 11,500 Pakistani Rupees ($110). It is available to purchase from retail stores starting today.

Interestingly, the second batch of Android One smartphone is reportedly launching in India next week. The device, which is said to sport high-end hardware specs, is expected to launch with a price tag of Rs 12,000 at a media event on July 14.

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Manish is pursuing a degree in Computer Science and Engineering but spends more time in writing about technology. He has written for a number of Indian and international publications including BetaNews, BGR India, WinBeta, MakeTechEasier, MediaNama, and Digit magazine among others. When not writing, you would find him ranting about the state of digital journalism on Twitter.