VPN (Virtual Private Network) enables internet users to browse through public network with an added layer of security. The VPN comes to play especially for enterprise users who need to comply with the companies prescribed standards before connecting to the workplace. VPN services is offered by a host of providers and one can easily subscribe to their services.


That being said, choosing a reliable VPN and trusting the same for your needs can become a tricky solution and folks at Opera browser seem to understand the same. Opera browser has released a developer version of desktop browser which comes baked with native VPN support and all you need to do is just toggle a button and Voila! The 256-bit native VPN support gets turned on. Now this free VPN will hide all your details from the authorities and lets be candid, VPN is usually used to circumvent the restrictions.

As of now the developer version supports only three simulated locations inclusive of Canada, Germany and the U.S. That’s not really a ton of options out there but hey the VPN comes free of cost and the final version is expected to accommodate new features. Next time you want to stream something that’s geographically restricted or you just want to make sure that you don’t leave any footprints behind VPN is the way and with Opera supporting it natively it just becomes better.

This move seems will being an extra layer of security to all the users and this just makes it relatively difficult for the authorities to spy on internet users thus adding fodder to the already ongoing battle of encryption Vs encryption with a backdoor for authorities. Lately most of the internet services including WhatsApp are bringing in encryption to their services thus ensuring privacy.

Source: EnGadget
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Mahit Huilgol is a Mechanical Engineering graduate and is a Technology and Automobile aficionado. He ditched the Corporate boardroom wars in the favor for technology battle ground. Also a foodie by heart and loves both the edible chips and the non-edible silicon chips.