Apple has recently added two new ads in its iPad Pro ad campaign. The ad campaign which kicked off in mid-February has been seeing new additions every now and then. The campaign mainly focuses on highlighting the features of the device that gives it an edge over the regular PCs. In the ad campaign, the California tech giant has taken tweets of some real Twitter users and has created various ads around those tweets.

In the beginning was a tweet…

All the ads in the campaign are of the same length which does not come as a surprise to us, keeping in mind, Apple’s penchant for attention to detail. All of them are 16 seconds long, which start with a real tweet from a real user, after which a voiceover takes over the steering and drives the ad towards the conclusion in which the voiceover gives the answers to the tweets and explains how the iPad Pro is better than a regular PC. For example, in one of the ads, Apple highlights how users can use Word on iOS, in another it shows how unlike the PC, the iPad Pro gets no virus, yet another shows the utility of an Apple Pencil, or how the device can replace multiple other devices like a scanner, laptop, and other desktop accessories. Although all of these ads start with real tweets, Apple has used actors in the ads to hold up the signs, to enact the script and do the voiceovers.

We have previously seen Apple’s love for white and keeping the ads simple and straightforward and this campaign walks on the same lines. All the ads are shot on plain white background with the same music playing in the background.

Them “Get a Mac” feels

The first thing we noticed about this campaign is the fact that the new iPad Pro campaign is not like the recent ads or campaign that Apple has released. The entire campaign looks more or less inspired by the good old “Get a Mac” campaign launched in the early 2000s. And if you look closely, that is what the campaign is actually about. Making people understand how the iPad Pro is actually better than the PC. Although the iPad Pro is a tablet from Apple, the company has always tried to showcase it as a complete device, which has been a little difficult for many users to believe. The latest ad campaign is an attempt by the company to work its way around the common problems or prejudices the users have when it comes to the iPad Pro. Some people might complain that Apple is not being creative enough and is bringing almost the same ideas on the table, but we tend to disagree. There is a lot of creativity in terms of how they have created the ads and the copy. The ads might be sailing in the same direction but we think the water this time around is different.

ipad-pro-ad-3

We loved the fact that Apple has used tweets of real people and built the ads around them. The fact that these ads cater to the questions and the confusions of the users along with being interesting and entertaining at the same time, scores a goal for us. All the ads are short and crisp and cater to the questions of the users and not just the questions but also offer a concrete answer to those who mock the iPad Pro for not being “a complete device.”

In our previous Apple Tech Ad-ons, we have mentioned how Apple pays very close attention to detail, which is why we think all the ads in the campaign are in sync. All of them are 16 seconds long when it comes to the duration, all of them are about real tweets, all of them are shot on a white background, all of them have the same background music and this not only stresses on the fact that these ads are part of the same campaign but also provides a continuity and harmony in the ads.

Another thing that we really love is the fact that although all these ads are like beads on one string, they can be aired independently and will still make sense to the audience viewing it for the first time. The very fact that you do not have to know all the ads or the whole concept behind the ad campaign to know what the message is scored another point to the campaign.

Keeping it straight and simple

Unlike many of its recent ads for the iPhone and the AirPods, Apple has kept this one as simple and straight as possible. There are no unnecessary colors or elements in the frame which we think is Apple’s good old way of making sure that the audience focuses only and only on the product and the copy and nothing else. The ad talks just about the product and different ads highlight different USP of the iPad Pro.

ipad-pro-ad-2

We also love how boldly Apple always attacks the PC in the ad campaign which takes us back in time. There is no hiding here – it clearly is the fight between Apple and all the others out there. And we cannot really ignore the understated but yet killer sense of humor Apple has. All the ads have a subtle humor appeal working in the background and we love the fact that it is just there, often surfacing at the very end to leave the viewer smiling. In many ads, we have seen that the humor takes over the ad so completely that while the ad becomes memorable, the product does not. There is no danger of that happening here.

Look out, PC? In ad terms, yes

In this particular campaign, Apple has tried to take on the PC, the tone is light but the business is serious. Will it make the ad as memorable as say the one for AirPods? Perhaps not, but it definitely does what it has been created for, highlighting the product and its USPs. Oh, and poking fun at the competition.

ipad-pro-ad-1

We love the new iPad Pro campaign for not just one but many reasons and while the world is speculating that the company will be launching a new iPad soon and this comes as a base to build up the hype for that, we have got nothing to complain about. We got a nice ad campaign with a tinge of humor in it and it all makes sense. What else do we need?

An ice pack for the PC lovers, perhaps.


Also Read:
 
Feature Writer

Akriti Rana holds a degree in journalism and mass communication. She has reported on mobile technology and gadgets for My Mobile, and has interned with the Hindustan Times, India News and The Yellow Coin Communication. She loves writing, reading, dogs and food (in an order of preference that varies on deadlines and proximity) and has of late taken to tussling with cameras.