Google Translate has been a lifesaver for many people out there who frequently connects with people from other countries for work or studies or anything else. But there was a major caveat – you’d have to open the app every time to enjoy its functionality. But with the new update for Google Translate, the caveat is gone.

Google introduced many features with Android 6.0 like Google Now-On-Tap, Doze, New Animations, New App Drawer, App Permissions and many other things. One of the standout feature beside Doze was “In-App-Translation” which lets you translate any text in any app or website with just a simple tap. Until today, the feature was only limited to devices running Android 6.0 and higher.

google-translate-demo

But With this new update, Google is bringing it to any Android device running 4.2 and higher, and that should include majority of the active Android smartphones. To use this feature, you just have to select and copy the text you want to translate and a translation-floating-button will pop up right there in the app you’re using (be it WhatsApp or Opera) and then just convert it to the language of your preference. This tap-to-translate feature works with 103 languages (including most of the Indian languages like Punjabi, Marathi, Bengali etc). And if you’re going to a “no internet zone”, you can download the offline language packs which has their size reduced as much as 90% to just 25 MB each. And the cherry on the cake is that “offline mode” now works on iOS too.

What’s more? Google Translate’s “Word-Lens” feature which lets you translate text from images, now supports traditional and simplified Chinese translations to and from English. So with “in-app-translation”, “offline mode for iOS”, “word-lens supporting chinese”, Google is going to make anyone who uses Google Translate happy. Give these features a shot, you’re gonna like them for sure.


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Tamonas is from West Bengal, India. He is studying BSc. in Physiology(Hons.). He loves to make common people aware about technology in the simplest of terms.